Tag: Visual art grants

Pabst sound society beer

This record was a hair away from not being produced at all. Syd Nathan, the “king” of King Records at the time, saw James Brown as more of a single artist and refused to finance the making of a full album, nonetheless a live one. Nathan signed Brown and put out “Please, Please, Please,” which sold quite well. Unfortunately, Brown’s next nine singles were complete flops.

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Hood rappers 2019

A classic example is the LCD Soundsystem song “All My Friends.” The song develops extensively, without an obvious lyrical structure. There are certainly repeated melodies, various layers coming and going, and a strong lyrical narrative, but it never deviates from that repetitive piano part.

Top 40 songs usually reach the first appearance of a chorus at around 0:45 seconds in. In other words, they rush to the chorus. What does this mean, other than that a song’s memorability is more important than its meaning and message? I’m not sure, but it’s a valid way to write and sell your song, that’s for sure!

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Old school rappers from the 90’s

In my video example above, my variations were as follows: First, I removed the hi-hat entirely (variation 1), then I added a kick and snare hit (variation 2), and finally I added kick and snare hits while removing snippets of the hi-hat pattern (variation 3). All of which is in addition to an already interesting yet repetitive beat sequence.

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R&b artists 2016

Martin hopes to help all of his students tangibly further themselves as musicians, as well as meeting the goals of the course. He says the most important advice he ever got was to only speak when you have something to say — a lesson he applies to music.

“Thank U, Next”: The sustain of that dreamy electric piano in this chord loop solidifies the G♭ chord as a G♭M13 and the F chord is an F7(#9) secondary dominant (V/vi )! Then we have a regular B♭m before returning to the tonic — but not so fast! We haven’t really returned home, since it’s a D♭7, another secondary dominant (V/IV) that sends us back to G♭M13. These secondary dominants act like coal nuggets to fuel a perpetual motion chord-loop machine. Form-wise, you could also call the chorus extensions “post-choruses,” but I already used up my “P” for the pre-chorus sections, so I’ll just call these extensions “variations” and be done with it.

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Upcoming artists 2019

Filippo Faustini is a guitarist and producer based in London. He graduated in Modern Guitar at the Conservatoire in Frosinone (Italy) and then he completed an MA in Composition for Moving Images at City University (London). He is the guitarist and producer for the London-based alt rock/ambient band, Alice in the Cruel Sea. Filippo is also the co-founder of a recently formed music production company called Music Brewery where he works as producer and mixing engineer. 

We briefly mentioned “Suzanne” by Leonard Cohen earlier. Aside from the religious references, it was also originally a poem Cohen wrote and published before the song was ever recorded. Try writing a poem purely on pen and paper, without worrying about melody or rhythm at all. Once you’ve got a solid draft, try setting it to music. Ultimately, you might need to be inventive or make some changes to make everything flow nicely, but this can produce good results.

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Old school rap groups

A prolific Nashville songwriter (who shall remain nameless) has a strategy where he wakes up and writes down five ideas, lines, or thoughts in his journal. In the sessions he goes to that day, he’ll pull from that list and use the words as the first line of the song, the last line of the song, the first line of the chorus — it could even just be a word. The point is, the words he writes down are often fresh to him, but they also came up for a reason — something he’s dealing with, or something a friend is going through — and he’s able to use that idea as a target for that day’s sessions.

“Mia”: Huh… so the new Top 5-ers these last few weeks have had tempos of 96, 98, and now 97 BPM. Is this divine synchronicity or just dumb chance? You decide. And we’ve got a couple of slight variations here: the occasional♭VII chord showing up in the loop, different verse lengths. There may be more variations as far as lyrics are concerned, but alas, I don’t speak Spanish.

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