Tag: Grants for female artists 2020

Dance grants for individuals

Evan Zwisler is a NYC-based musician who is most notably known for his work with The Values as a songwriter and guitarist. He is an active member of the Brooklyn music scene, throwing fundraisers and organizing compilations for Planned Parenthood and the Anti-Violence Project. He started playing music in the underground punk scene of Shanghai with various local bands when he was in high school before going to California for college and finally moving to New York in 2012.

The Scottish duo of Michael Sandison and Marcus Eoin known as Boards of Canada is one of the most influential production teams in electronic music history. The sounds they conjure from their synthesizers and samplers are nothing if not evocative: of half-remembered childhoods, warbly analog recording mediums, reality-bending psychedelic experiences, and so on.

Continue reading “Dance grants for individuals”

Performing arts grants for schools

“The situation with PledgeMusic is incredibly heartbreaking for musicians and their fans,” says Bandzoogle’s Director of Artist & Industry Outreach, Dave Cool. “And it’s yet another reminder that as an industry, we need to do much better by the musicians we’re trying to help. With Bandzoogle, artists can be assured that any money their fans pledge to their campaigns is reaching them directly, and immediately.”

The Headliners Club is kind of like a “build your own customized course.” If you need help on a specific project that doesn’t quite fit within one of our courses, you’ll be able to work with a Soundfly Mentor one-on-one to create a customized one-month learning program specifically tailored to your needs and goals.

Continue reading “Performing arts grants for schools”

Grants for artists of color 2019

+ Pursue your dreams faster with a Soundfly Mentor! Share your music goals with us and we’ll pair you up with a professional musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran who will help you achieve them in a customized four-week session.

Born in Cambridge, England, Judith Weir’s musical path has been a very British one. Having studied with Sir John Taverner at an early age and later at King’s College Cambridge, Weir’s music proudly takes inspiration from British medieval history and the traditional folk arts of her parents’ homeland of Scotland. Another star-studded member of this list, Weir won an Ivor Novello Award in 2015 and a year earlier was appointed the first female Master of the Queen’s Music, a position which she currently holds for ten years, succeeding Sir Peter Maxwell Davis. True to her traditional roots and interests, Weir’s music has strong roots in British choral music, yet her output also includes eight operas, many orchestral works, chamber pieces, and solo instrumental pieces. If you’re after something modern and yet deeply rooted in tradition, I highly recommend the work of Dame Judith Weir.

Continue reading “Grants for artists of color 2019”

Real gangster rappers

Sorry if you weren’t there, but the late ’90s and early 2000s were fantastic. Once P2P was pioneered via Napster, the floodgates opened and the world of music sharing was here to stay. As an artist and a listener, my personal opinion is that we’ve regressed from that time. The problem with the P2P era, admittedly, was that artists were not getting remunerated for their recordings as disruptive tech eagerly pulled down the bloated major-label system. But, well, we’re still not getting paid that much anyway.

The complicated squiggles you see in real-world string vibrations are the mathematical sum of all these different harmonics. Each harmonic produces a different pitch, so when you play a note, you’re actually hearing many different pitches at once. It’s possible to isolate the different harmonics of a string and hear their individual pitches. Harmonics are very useful for tuning your guitar. They are also the basis of the whole Western tuning system generally.

Continue reading “Real gangster rappers”